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By Innocentius Marie Bochenski

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211 El [lo. 212 El [lo. 371 [lo. 213 El. 10 D. CONVERSION The laws of conversion of necessary and possible are analogous to 9. 41-43: * 10. 41. * 10. 42. * 10. 43. * 10. 44. * 10. 45. * 10. 46. 1 prim. of double neg. (0) sentences N(XeP) 3 N(PeS)27 N(#aP( 3 N(PiS)2* N(8iP) 3 N(Pi8)29 O ( f J e P )3 O ( P e J 930 ()(#aP)3 ()(Pi#)31 ()(XiP) 3 ()(Pi#). 41-43 meet a serious difficulty if the structure 10. 21 ff. is presupposed. z4 An. Pr. A 13, 32 a 37f. - 85 ib. 38f. - 26 ib. 40. - 27 An. Pr. A 3, 25 a 298.

E 1,1025 b 25; Met. K 7,1064 b 1. The Aoytxai in T o p . A 14, 105 b 19#. means clearly “epistemological”. - Met. r 3, 1005 b 2-5. 6 Top. A 1,100 a 25. - 7 A n . Pr. A 1, 24 b 18f. 26 ARISTOTLE it is that it does not attribute to the syllogism any definite status: for “Adyo$’ may mean equally well a verbal discourse, a train of thought, or an objective structure (of the kind of the Stoic ilextdv), while exactly the same is true of the xeot&oesc and 8~0sof which the syllogism is said to be composed.

M i b . B;2 , 5 3 a l O f . - z 1 i b . 2 0 f . ; B 2, 53 a lOf. - 22 ib. 22-26; B 2, 53 a 12fl. 52 ARISTOTLE 9 C. SYLLOGISMS Aristotle stated first fourteen syllogistic laws (the later “modes”): 23 First Figure : * 9. 51. * 9. 52. * 9. 53. * 9. 54. SoP (Cesare)28 (Camestres) (Festino) 30 (Baroco) 31 M a p . M a s , 3. 3. MiS . 3 . SOP (Darapti) 32 (Felapton) 33 (Disamis) 34 (Datisi) 35 (Bocardo) 36 (Ferison). 37 Second Figure : * 9. 55. * 9. 56. * 9. 57. * 9. 58. Third Figure : * 9. 59. * 9.

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